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MSc Global Health

Course Title MSc Global Health
Qualification MSc.
Duration One year Full time/ Two years Part Time
Next Intake September 2018

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The MSc in Global Health is a multi-disciplinary course using biosocial models to address global health challenges. The course provides students with academic knowledge and practical skills to become leaders in global health research, policy and practice

Welcome and thank you for your interest in the MSc in Global Health at Trinity College Dublin. Our programme is designed to produce leaders in global health research, policy and practice. With a strong emphasis on understanding how to strengthen health services at a systems level our programme develops and sharpens critical thinking, analysis and practice.

Our mix of students from low, middle and high income countries, provides for significant opportunities to learn across different cultural and contextual situations.  Students from diverse backgrounds including clinical, biomedical, social science and other backgrounds consistently question each others assumptions and provide a rich dynamic for explorative learning.  The Centre for Global Health puts a strong emphasis on the importance of staff who have lived in low and middle income countries and have practical experience of global health challenges.  Our concern to move 'upstream' and address the social, system and environmental causes of clinical problems is also a defining feature of the programme.

We believe that this course, with its unique blend of social and health science perspectives, will equip you with the skills to contribute to improving health systems and health practice locally and internationally. We hope you would be able to join us in what is an exciting and stimulating academic environment as we address the challenges of global health in the world.

Our website provides detailed information about the MSc in Global Health programme and the admissions process. The answers to many of your questions will be found here. If you have any further questions, please feel free to contact us.

Professor Joe Barry
Course Director

P: + 353 1 896 2764
E: joebarry@tcd.ie  or global.health@tcd.ie

Objectives

This innovative and successful programme, run by the Centre for Global Health, aims to provide graduates with a greater appreciation of the global interconnectedness of health problems and to equip them with a range of analytical and methodological skills to address the challenges of global health. Designed for individuals from a wide range of disciplines and professions, the programme adopts a multidisciplinary approach that integrates health and social science perspectives to analyse, design, implement and evaluate health programmes within a global context.

Global health is an attempt to address health problems and issues that transcend national boundaries, and are informed by the circumstances and experiences of countries in differing contexts. The underlying assumption is that the world’s health problems are shared and are best tackled by cooperative action and the sharing of innovative solutions. 

The MSc in Global Health augments traditional approaches to public and international health by bringing together perspectives and insights from a range of health and social sciences in understanding and resolving the challenges of global health. These problems may arise, for example, in relief and development programmes in developing countries; in conflict and post-conflict situations; with refugees, asylum seekers and economic migrants; with tourists and business travellers. All countries give rise to inequities in health, wealth, education and human rights, and the interconnectedness of these issues will be a major theme running throughout the course.

The course also lays emphasis on ‘local' experiences that resonates globally in the case of Ireland. These include the influence of poverty and rapid social change on health and identity in Ireland; migration and refugee welfare, the consequences of ethnic conflict, the peace process and the challenges of reconciliation for creating inclusive health services. The strongest emphasis within the course is on health in developing countries and the impact of globalisation.

What is Global Health?

Global health is an area for study, research, and practice that places a priority on improving and achieving equity in health for all people worldwide. Global health emphasises transnational health issues, determinants, and solutions; involves many disciplines within and beyond the health sciences and promotes interdiscipinary collaboration; and is a synthesis of population-based prevention with individual-level clinical care.

Definition from Koplan JP et al. (2009) Towards a common definition of global health. The Lancet 373, 1993-1995.

Programme Learning Outcomes

The overall aim of the course is to equip students with the analytical and methodological skills to address the multifaceted challenges of global health whether they are in high-income or low-income countries. On successful completion of this programme graduates will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate knowledge of current perspectives and insights from a range of health and social sciences to understand the broader and interconnecting causes of the world’s health problems and inequities, and be able to propose viable solutions.
  2. Apply a range of analytical and methodological skills to address the multifaceted challenges of global health in an ethically responsible manner and to contribute on a broader scale to the design, implementation and evaluation of health programmes
  3. Apply knowledge, handle complexity and exercise best judgements, individually and in groups, when faced with inevitable health challenges created by diverse settings by utilising leadership and other key skills
  4. Effectively communicate through appropriate media and audiences, and efficiently take responsibility to complete complex health-related activities individually and in groups
  5. Demonstrate the essential knowledge, skills and capacity for self-directed learning to advance professionally in the field of global health through further study or work in countries at any level of development
  6. Independently plan and conduct a global health-related research project in a domestic or international setting and disseminate research findings accordingly

Teaching and Learning Strategies

The programme adopts the following methods to facilitate teaching and learning among participants:

  • Teaching based on evidence from current research
  • A learning methodology that stresses active participation of students and acknowledgement and utilization of the varied experience that each participant brings to the course
  • Team based learning and teaching that reflects the reality in which people work in the global health arena
  • An assessment strategy that allows students to direct both individual assignments and dissertations to their own career interests and professional development
  • An assessment strategy which encourages students to develop critical appraisal, analytical and methodological capabilities to address the challenges of global health
  • A range of strategies that encourages self directed learning and individual ownership and utilization of learning opportunities.

Students are expected to be active in charting the direction of their learning and utilization of available learning opportunities. Based on the above, the teaching and learning methods include:

Self-Directed Study
Self-directed study is a major component of the course. With this method, participants are encouraged to utilize the wide range of learning resources at their disposal, some of which are introduced at the beginning of the course. Students are advised to set aside study time each week, ideally on Thursday and Fridays which are lecture-free days during Term 1. As the assessment is ongoing throughout the year, students need to be disciplined in organising time for writing assignments. Some study time has been scheduled into the timetable. This is primarily to allow students to source material in the libraries and work in study groups.

Formal Lectures
These facilitate orientation to topics and issues and presentation of relevant updated information and specialized knowledge in an organized manner. At the Masters level, lectures provide useful background information that aid critical assessment of module materials and self directed learning.

Interactive Lectures and Discussions
This is a situation where the module coordinator or a member of the class leads in the discussion of issues, which were raised during presentations. Participants are encouraged to interact and share their knowledge with others in the group. This provides an opportunity to explore the varied experience of participants within the group.

Seminars and Presentations
Seminars and presentations give participants the opportunity to investigate topics and present their findings to the rest of the group. They are useful in that they enable participants acquire investigatory experience, the sharing of knowledge gained and the justification to others of the conclusions reached.

Tutorials
This encourages participatory learning exercises where students are allocated to small groups to share knowledge and experiences and attempt to resolve problems arising from lectures and self directed study.

Case Studies
Detailed case studies may be used as a teaching method to comprehensively describe a number of global health issues. Using real-life situations will help students consider a number of important lessons and appreciate the complexity of global health.

Admissions

Admission to the MSc in Global Health programme at Trinity College Dublin is competitive with a maximum of 25 students per year.  Applicants should possess a strong academic record, international experience, and an interest in global health issues.

The online application system is available from late November in the year prior to entry, and applications will be reviewed following three rounds of admissions.  The three application deadlines are the first day of February, April and June.  Your application and all supporting materials, including references, must be received by these deadlines.  It is advised to submit your complete application as early as possible prior to the deadline.  Late applications may be accepted after the final application deadline if places are still available, please e-mail global.health@tcd.ie to enquire.

For more information for prospective students to Trinity College Dublin, please visit the Graduate Studies Office website: https://www.tcd.ie/Graduate_Studies/students/prospective/pg-courses/

Application Procedure

Applicants for the MSc in Global Health must apply online through http://my.tcd.ie   by the deadline.  To apply, go to https://my.tcd.ie/urd/sits.urd/run/siw_ipp_lgn.login?process=siw_ipp_app&code1=DPTMD-GHEA-1F09&code2=0003  
Along with the online application, additional supporting documents are required as follows:

  • Personal statement stating your interest in global health issues, why you wish to participate in the course, prior global health experience, and your career aspirations (not more than 500 words)
  • Curriculum vitae/résumé outlining academic achievements, awards and relevant work/volunteer experience
  • Copies of degree certificates
  • Copies of certificates of English language competence (for applicants whose native language is not English or whose language of previous university education is not English)
  • Two letters of reference signed by referee, one of whom should be able to comment on your academic ability.
  • Documents in support of EU fee paying status (for applicants from the European Union)
  • Copy of passport photo page

All of these documents are to be uploaded onto your online application

Please note that your application cannot be considered until you have submitted all of the required supplementary forms.
An online application processing fee of €55 is payable by debit or credit card at the time of application.  Please note that the online application processing fee is non-refundable.

Application Review

Submitted applications will be reviewed following the three rounds of admissions. 

A certain number of offers are available after each round of admissions and each applicant will receive notification from the Academic Registry.  If you have been successful, the Academic Registry will make you an offer and include a deadline to receive your decision.  If you choose to accept this offer, a deposit towards the tuition fee will be required.  If no additional places are available during a particular round of admissions, applicants who meet the minimum criteria for acceptance will be notified that their application will be considered as part of the next round of admissions.  If there are no further rounds of admissions or there are no additional places available, you will be placed on a waiting list in case any places become available. 

Entry Requirements

This programme is intended for individuals from a wide range of disciplines and professions who wish to develop an understanding of health issues that integrate health and social science perspectives in a global context. As global health is a multidisciplinary field, applicants can be graduates of any academic discipline. 

Trinity College Dublin has high academic entry requirements for postgraduate courses.  Applicants will need to hold:

  • At least a 2.1 honours degree from an Irish university or equivalent result from a university in another country
  • A fluent command of the English language (requirements below)

In addition to the general entry requirements for postgraduate study in Trinity College, applicants must have a demonstrated interest and/or experience in global health or health issues in developing countries.

Further information for applicants from outside of Ireland is available from the Graduate Studies Office: https://www.tcd.ie/courses/postgraduate/how-to-apply/ and the International Office: http://www.tcd.ie/study/international/ 

English Language Requirements

All applicants whose first language is not English, must provide supporting documentary evidence of their competence in English.

The following tests results are recognised:

  • IELTS: Grade 6.5 with no individual band below 6
  • TOEFL: 88 – internet-based, 230 – computer-based, 570 – paper-based
  • Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English: Grade C
  • Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English: Grade C

Prospective applicants can get further clarification on entry requirements directly from the Graduate Studies Office: https://www.tcd.ie/courses/postgraduate/how-to-apply/requirements/international.php

Computer Competency

Although not an entry requirement, applicants are expected to be proficient users of a computer with the ability to perform the basic tasks needed to work efficiently (using e-mail, searching the internet, and creating documents). Computers are used throughout the programme and more advanced applications will be introduced such as SPSS (statistical analysis software) and NVivo (qualitative data analysis software). Successful applicants with a low computer competency will be encouraged to take an introduction to computers course prior to starting the programme.

Course Fees

The course fee for the MSc in Global Health is determined by residency.  Possession of a European Union passport or citizenship does not automatically grant entitlement to EU fees, as fee status is based on residency.  Only students who enrol on the full-time programmes can apply for a student visa.

Student fees can be obtained from the Financial Services Division (under Student Finance) Course Fees

In addition to the course fee, prospective students must also ensure available funds for living expenses and other costs while studying.  Students who decide to complete their research projects overseas will need additional funds of up to €1,500 to cover the costs involved.

Scholarships

Trinity College Dublin offers a number of scholarship opportunities for prospective and current students interested in study or research at Ireland's leading university. Since its foundation in 1592 Trinity College Dublin has sought to assist students of limited means and reward academic achievement. Specific scholarships exist for prospective undergraduate and postgraduate students. Information on these scholarships can be found here: http://www.tcd.ie/study/non-eu/scholarships/postgraduate/

Irish Aid Fellowship Training Programme

Applicants from Irish Aid priority countries (Ethiopia, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Tanzania, Timor Leste, Uganda, Vietnam and Zambia) are eligible for funding through the Irish Aid Fellowship Training Programme.  Each year, the Irish Aid Fellowship Training Programme funds a small number of suitably qualified candidates from Irish Aid priority countries to undertake postgraduate study in Ireland with the aim of supporting and enhancing the contribution recipients can make to development effort in their own countries. 

Application forms for the Fellowship Training Programme are available at Irish Embassies in partner countries.  The application deadline for the Irish Aid Fellowship Training Programme is 31 December prior to year of study.  You must make an application for both the Irish Aid Fellowship Training Programme and for the MSc in Global Health programme, as these are separate application processes. 

Further information about the Irish Aid Fellowship Training Programme, including eligibility, is available from the Irish Council for International Students (ICOS) website: http://www.icosirl.ie/eng/irish_aid_fellowships/fellowship_training_programme.html

Other Funding Sources

Trinity College Dublin does not offer funding for students on taught courses.  The Graduate Studies Office provides information regarding funding available from external sources: http://www.tcd.ie/study/non-eu/scholarships/postgraduate/

Most students will receive funding from their employers, governments, international agencies, trusts, charities, personal savings and loans from family and friends. Applicants are advised to seek funding early, preferably in the year before commencement. Most sponsors have information about application procedure and closing dates on their website.

There are many funding sources available, particularly for applicants from developing countries. These include the Joint Japan/World Bank Graduate Scholarship Programme, the Ford Foundation, Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, Leverhulme Trust, etc. The most common source of funding for students on the programme is the Irish Council for International Students (see information above).

Most sponsors have a set of criteria against which decisions on award are made and it is important that applicants are aware of these. When making an application, you are advised to send in your CV and covering letter stating why you are worthy of an award and also the use to which you intend to put the potential qualification.

Programme Structure

The MSc in Global Health is a one-year, full-time programme, with an option to study part-time over two years.  Students must complete the equivalent of 90 European Credit Transfer System (ECTS) credits to graduate: 60 ECTS credits for the taught component and 30 ECTS credits for the dissertation. The academic year is divided into three terms: Michaelmas (Term 1), Hilary (Term 2) and Trinity (Term 3). The first two terms form the taught component of the course, and the last term is to finalise the research dissertation requirement.

Term 1: Michaelmas (September - December)

Lectures for Term 1 commence at the end of September and students are required to complete 6 core compulsory modules. These core modules are designed to increase understanding of health determinants, health system organisation, health policy and financing, and various research methodologies and skills useful in the field of global health.  All core modules are assessed through continuous assessment.

Compulsory Modules

Module Coordinator: Prof Joe Barry & Dr  Michael O’Toole
ECTS Value: 5

Aims
This module will introduce students to some of the differing perspectives on the determinants of global health. Our aim is to give some insight into how people in different disciplines construct, or make sense, of similar problems. The disciplines covered in this module are some of those which make a contribution to understanding problems in Global Health but which are not studied, as disciplines, elsewhere on the Masters programme. It is important to understand some of the assumptions different disciplines may be working with and some of the unique benefits their understanding can contribute.

Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of this module, students will be able to:

  • Identify the distinct contribution of some of the different disciplines that contribute to global health
  • Critically   analyse   the   strengths   and   weaknesses   of   different   disciplines   and   identify the opportunities and challenges of interdisciplinary work

Module Content

  • Poverty, inequalities and the sustainable development goals
  • Global mental health
  • Climate change
  • Substance use
  • Communicable disease
  • Bio-pharmaceuticals
  • Anthropological perspective
  • Political perspective

Indicative Resources

Lecture notes and additional materials will be posted on Blackboard.

Methods of Teaching and Student Learning
A range of teaching methods will be used which encourage participation and interrogation of perspectives by students.  Lecturers will present some basic tenets of their discipline, which students will be required to apply to a Global Health Case Study.  Students will be assigned to groups, which will be tasked with jointly producing a report, which critiques an allocated Global Health Case Study and evaluates how different disciplinary approaches may contribute to that study.

Methods of Assessment
The marks for this module are awarded:
a) as a group mark for the merit of an 8,000 word written report (80%)
AND
b) as an individual peer-assessed mark for each person’s contribution to the process of the group, including the writing of the report (10%)
AND
c) a reflective piece (500-1000 words) in which the student will critique their own contribution to the process (10%).  The assessment therefore evaluates content and process.  Each group report will be assessed by at least two instructors.   Individual contributions to the group process will be assessed by other members of the groups with all participants using standardised forms to rate each other.

Module Coordinator: Dr James O’Mahony & Dr Steve Thomas
ECTS Value: 5

Aims
The aim of this module is to give participants an understanding of the concepts, applications and techniques of health economics and financing. It aims to inform students of the relevance and tools of economic analysis as they relate to health, health care and health systems.

Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of this module, students will be able to:

  • Describe and discuss the basic concepts, tools and techniques of economic analysis and their application to health and health care
  • Demonstrate and apply knowledge of the concepts of supply, demand and elasticity (with applications to health care financing and health promotion), the role of markets, the economics of health systems and health care financing and economic evaluation to global health

Module Content

  • Introduction to economics concepts
  • Supply of health care
  • Demand for health and health care
  • Markets and market failure
  • Economics of health systems
  • Range and features of health financing mechanisms
  • Techniques and tools of economic evaluation
  • Concepts and measure of equity

Indicative Resources
Pre-Reading

Core Text

  • McPake, Normand and Smith (2013) “Health Economics: An International Perspective” Routledge. 3rd Edition.

Other Core texts

Other Readings

  • McPake, B. User charges for health services in developing countries: a review of the economic literature. Social Science and Medicine, 1993; 36: 1397-1405
  • Vancelik S, Beyhun N, Acemoglu H and Calikoglu O (2007), “Impact of pharmaceutical promotion on prescribing decisions of general practitioners in Eastern Turkey” BMC Public Health. 7: 122
  • Målqvist M, Yuan B, Trygg N, Selling K, Thomsen S (2013) Targeted Interventions for Improved Equity in Maternal and Child Health in Low- and Middle-Income Settings: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. PLoS ONE 8(6): e66453. 
  • Normand C and Thomas S (2008) Health Care Financing and the Health System. In: Kris Heggenhougen and Stella Quah, editors International Encyclopedia of Public Health, Vol 3. San Diego: Academic Press; 2008. pp. 160-174
  • Witter S and Garshong B (2009) “Something old or something new? Social health insurance in Ghana.” BMC International Health and Human Rights. 9:20
  • Blanchet N J, Fin G and Osei-Akoto I (2012) “The Effect of Ghana’s National Health Insurance Scheme on Health Care Utilisation.” Ghana Medical Journal, Vol 46. No 2. pp 76-84
  • Lagarde M, Palmer N (2011), The impact of user fees on access to health services in low and middle-income countries. The Cochrane Collaboration. Published by JohnWiley & Sons, Ltd.
  • Stepurko T, Pavlova M, Gryga I, Groot W (2010) Empirical studies on informal patient payments for health care services: a systematic and critical review of research methods and instruments. . BMC Health Services Research 2010, 10:273 http://www.biomedcentral.com/1472-6963/10/273
  • Folland, S., Goodman, A.C., and Stano, M., (2004), The Economics of Health and Health Care, Pearson Education – Chapter 17, pages 395-399 only.
  • McIntyre, D. and Mooney, G., (2007), The Economics of Health Equity, Cambridge University Press – Chapter 1
  • Williams, A. (1997), ‘Intergenerational Equity: An Exploration of the ‘Fair Innings’ Argument’, Health Economics, Vol 6, pp.117-132.
  • http://www.healthcarepriorities.org/Papers/Williams%20HE%201997.pdf
  • Sen, A. (2002), ‘Why Health Equity?’, Health Economics, Vol. 11, pp.659-666.
  • http://svenkatapuram.googlepages.com/whyhealthequity.pdf
  • Rosa Dias, P., and Jones, A.M. (2007), ‘Giving Equality of Opportunity a Fair Innings’, Health Economics, Vol. 16, pp.109-112. http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/hec.1207
  • Williams, A. (1999), ‘Calculating the Global Burden of Disease: Time for a Strategic Reappraisal?’, Health Economics, Feb 8(1), pp.1-8.
  • McGuire, A. (2001), ‘Theoretical Concepts in the Economic Evaluation of Health Care’ in Drummond, M.F., and McGuire, A. (eds), Economic Evaluation in Health Care: Merging Theory with Practice, Oxford University Press.
  • Dolan, P. (2000), ‘The Measurement of Health Related Quality of Life for Use in Resource Allocation Decisions in Health Care’, in the Handbook of Health Economics, Elsevier.
  • Ryan, M., et al (2008) ‘The cost-effectiveness of cotrimoxazole prophylaxis in HIV-infected children in Zambia’, AIDS, Vol. 22, 6, pp. 749-757.
  • http://journals.lww.com/aidsonline/Fulltext/2008/03300/The_cost_effectiveness_of_cotrimoxazole.10.aspx
  • Weinstein, M.C. (2006), ‘Decision Rules for Incremental Cost-Effectiveness Analysis’, in Jones, A. (ed) Elgar Companion to Health Economics, Edward Elgar Publishing.
  • Briggs A. (2001), ‘Handling Uncertainty in Economic Evaluation and Presenting the
  • Results’ in Drummond, M.F. and McGuire, A. (eds), Economic Evaluation in Healthcare: Merging Theory and Practice, Oxford University Press.
  • Rannan-Eliya, R., and Somananathan, A. (2006), ‘Equity in Health and Healthcare Systems in Asia’, in Jones, A., Elgar Companion to Health Economics, Edward Elgar Publishing.
  • Anne Mills, John E Ataguba, James Akazili, Jo Borghi, Bertha Garshong, Suzan Makawia, Gemini Mtei, Bronwyn Harris, Jane Macha, Filip Meheus, Di McIntyre (2012) Equity in fi nancing and use of health care in Ghana, South Africa, and Tanzania: Implications for paths to universal coverage
  • WHO. (2010) Health systems financing: the path to universal coverage. Geneva: World Health Organization.
  • Wagstaff, A. and Van Doorslaer, E., (2000), ‘Equity in Health Care Finance and Delivery’. in Culyer, A.J., and Newhouse, J.P. (eds), Handbook of Health Economics, Vol. 1.   http://www2.eur.nl/ecuity/public_papers/NH_Chapter.pdf

Lecture notes, additional materials and articles will be posted on Blackboard. Additional reading lists will be recommended before and after sessions.

Methods of Teaching and Student Learning
This module combines traditional lectures and e‐learning, alongside self‐study.  Each student will be required to work on an assigned research topic over the term to apply the principles taught in the module.  Formal interactive lectures, with group work, will run for two 1 ½ hours sessions.

Methods of Assessment
Assessment of this module will be done by written assignment set by the Module Coordinator.

Module Coordinator: Dr Sarah Barry
ECTS Value: 5

Aims
This module aims to provide students with a greater appreciation of health policy and systems at the global and local level in both humanitarian and development contexts. The module examines the range of factors that shape and determine health policy and health systems in various contexts, focusing on the similarities and differences between countries and at the global level.

Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of this module, students will be able to:

  • Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of a diverse range of influences on the development of health policies and systems
  • Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the key actors engaged in the development and implementation of health programmes, their inter relationships and ways of working
  • Critically appraise health policies and systems

Module Content

  • Understanding health policy: analysis and frameworks
  • Health policy: Stakeholders and globalisation
  • Introduction to health systems
  • Health systems in emergencies and transition/fragile states
  • Global Health Partnerships and (GHPs)
  • Global Health Initiatives (GHIs)
  • Developing country health systems
  • Health care finance and incentives
  • Donor agencies

Indicative Resources
The module coordinator and guest lecturers will provide recommended reading lists.   Lecture notes and additional materials will be posted on Blackboard.

Methods of Teaching and Student Learning
The module will combine lectures, self-study and e‐learning classes. There is an emphasis on a participatory approach to learning, drawing as much as possible on the knowledge and experiences of the participants.

Methods of Assessment

Assessment of this module will be done by assignment set by the Module Coordinator.

Module Coordinator: Dr Catherine McCabe
ECTS Value: 5

Aims
This module gives participants a solid grounding in how to generate the necessary evidence to inform ethical policy and action by using a variety of qualitative research techniques. It presents a range of qualitative and combined methodological approaches in researching health issues. While the module traces the philosophical traditions in health related social research, including both theoretical and methodological elements, it is structured to facilitate the development of a research proposal for student dissertations. Emphasis is laid on appropriate research methodologies and research tools for each methodological approach. The rigour of the research process, and how to ensure the validity of results, are key objectives.

Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of this module, students will be able to:

  • Design and implement a range of health related research by applying knowledge of various qualitative research methodologies to investigate health and social issues
  • Critically evaluate previous research by applying criteria for assessing methodological rigour in health related research

Module Content

  • Principals of Social Research
  • Theoretical perspectives of Qualitative research
  • Qualitative research Methodologies (1)
  • Qualitative Research Methodologies (2)
  • Descriptive Qualitative Research
  • Qualitative data collection
  • Qualitative data analysis
  • Rigor in Qualitative research

Indicative Resources
Our core qualitative text is Pope and Mays (2006) Qualitative Research in Health Care, Blackwell: Oxford. There is a variety of additional texts that students may find suitable for each component of the module. Additional reading will be recommended before and after sessions. The library holds most of the recommended texts and a good collection of social science research texts if you want to extend your reading. Lecture notes and additional materials will be posted on Blackboard.

Methods of Teaching and Student Learning
This module combines lectures, seminar sessions, group work and individual exercises, one lecture and one seminar per week. Each student will be assigned to a group and each group will be required to co-operate throughout the term to apply the principles taught in the module.  Formal  interactive  lectures  will  run  for 1½  hours  followed  by  tutorials/student  lead  seminars  for  1¼  hours.

Methods of Assessment
Assessment for this module will be based on practical work conducted throughout the semester, with a final group presentation (30%), and an individual research proposal (60%), each of which will be assessed by at least two instructors.  Finally, 10% of the overall total will be allocated to peer-assessment.

Module Coordinator: Prof Catherine Comiskey & Dr  Nuha Ibrahim
ECTS Value: 5

Aims
This module teaches students how to conduct quantitative research. It also helps students to understand how to design quantitative data collection tools. The data analysis lectures within this module aim to stimulate students’ interest in, and knowledge and appreciation of global health statistics. It will provide students with some key transferable skills that will be useful in all professions. The emphasis in the module will be on applying the techniques to healthcare data and on understanding and interpreting results in real life data sets.

Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of this module, students will be able to:

  • Understand the application of quantitative research in global health
  • Identify key features of quantitative analysis including descriptive and inferential statistics in a range of study designs.
  • Conduct basic data analysis using SPSS.

Module Content

  • Quantitative Research Design
  • Surveys Techniques and Methods
  • Statistical Concepts:
    • Types of Data
    • Description of data sets
    • Graphical display of data sets
    • Forming and testing hypothesis for different types of data
    • Making predictions based on the data
    • Compare two different data sets
    • Writing data analysis statement
    • Read, understand and conduct a basic analysis of relevant data sets.
  • SPSS hands‐on data analysis:
    • Introduction to SPSS
    • Entering data and basic data management
    • Performing basic analysis techniques
    • Graphing data

Indicative Resources
The module coordinator will provide recommended reading lists.  Lecture notes and additional materials will be posted on Blackboard.

Methods of Teaching and Student Learning
The module will run for 27 hours during the first semester. 15 hours will be devoted to lectures with 12 hours SPSS data analysis workshop will compliment lectures. This aspect of the course will focus on understanding the basic workings of SPSS and learning how to perform basic statistical analyses with emphasis on descriptive statistics and graphics. Great importance is attached to the practical sessions, as the development of practical skills in statistics depends in a large part on deciding how to interpret results.

References

  • Comiskey, C.M. and Dempsey, O. (2013). Analysing data from small and large samples and normal and non normal distributions. Chapter in Quantitative Health Research, Ed. E.A Curtis and J. Drennan, McGraw Hill, Open University Press, England. ISBN 978-033524573-4
  • Curtis, E., Comiskey, C.M. and Dempsey, O. (2016)Correlational Research: Importance and Use in Nursing and Health Research, Nurse Researcher Vol 23, no 6, 20-25
  • I. Scot and D. Mazhindu. (2005) Statistics for Health Care Professionals; An Introduction. Sage, UK.
  • SPSS Survival Manual (2016) 6th Edition
  • Discovering Statistics Using SPSS ( 2009) 3rd Edition

http://www.soc.univ.kiev.ua/sites/default/files/library/elopen/andy-field-discovering-statistics-using-spss-third-edition-20091.pdf

Methods of Assessment

Exam 1: Multiple choice questions testing knowledge of statistical concepts covered in the lectures [50%]

Exam 2: Multiple choice questions testing students’ knowledge on the practical skills they learn during SPSS workshops. [50%]

Module Coordinators: Dr. Enida Friel
ECTS Value: 5

This module is an introduction to basic principles and methods of epidemiology. It is largely based on the book ‘Basic Epidemiology’ authored by Bonita et al and published by WHO, a widely used resource, downloadable free from:   http://whqlibdoc.who.int/publications/2006/9241547073_eng.pdf. The book can also be purchased as hard copy or as an e‐book.

Aim
The aim of the module is to:

  • Explain the principles of disease causation with emphasis on environmental factors.
  • Encourage the application of epidemiology to disease prevention, health promotion, and wider health policy development, implementation and evaluation.
  • Stimulate a continuing professional interest in epidemiology

Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of this module, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge of:

  • The nature and uses of epidemiology
  • The epidemiological approach to defining and measuring the occurrence of health related states in populations
  • The strengths and limitations of epidemiological study designs
  • The epidemiological approach to causation
  • The contribution of epidemiology to disease prevention, health promotion and wider health policy development, implementation and evaluation

In addition students will have gained skills to:

  • Describe the common causes of death, diseases and disability in a given context
  • Outline appropriate study design to planning, monitoring and evaluation of a health intervention/policy
  • Critically evaluate the literature

Module content
The module will contain but not be limited to the following subjects:

  • What is epidemiology?
  • Measuring health and disease
  • Types of epidemiological studies
  • Causation in epidemiology
  • Epidemiology, prevention and health promotion; communicable and non-communicable diseases
  • Epidemiology and health policy
  • Practical epidemiology

Resources
A reading list may be recommended in addition to the ‘Basic Epidemiology’ book (download free from: http://whqlibdoc.who.int/publications/2006/9241547073_eng.pdf. or purchase as hard copy or as an e‐book). This reading list, long with lecture notes, exercises, case studies, articles for review etc. will be posted in Blackboard.

Methods of teaching and student learning
The module will run for 18 hours. Part of it will be dedicated to introduction of the theory of epidemiology. A significant portion of time will however be spent on discussing practical examples, exercises, case studies as well as critically reviewing the literature. There will be group and individual work.

Methods of assessment
Group assignment and presentation: 30%
Open book exam: 70%

Lectures run every week from Monday through Thursday. Students are also required to participate in the Global Health Seminar series as part of the curriculum.  Friday will be for personal study, where the schedule on this day will be left to the discretion of the student.   Epidemiology is scheduled as a one-week intensive module during the last week of Term 1.

Hilary Term (January - April)

In Term 2, students are required to complete two compulsory modules and 4 optional modules, which may reflect the diversity of their academic, research and career interests. Term 2 is organised in a modular structure, with ten one-week teaching blocks.  Each optional module is a one-week intensive course, with lectures scheduled Monday to Friday.   The additional weeks where students are not registered for modules are intended for personal study and preparation for the individual research project in Term 3.

Compulsory Modules

Module Coordinator: Dr Ogenna Uduma
ECTS Value: 5

Aims
This core module introduces students to the practical skills required for project planning and management in the field of global health. It is designed as a dynamic module, which takes students through the entire project cycle management (PCM).

Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of this module students should be able to:

  • Demonstrate knowledge of different approaches to project development, with a particular focus on participatory and results-based planning
  • Explain the stages of the project cycle and the concept and practice of project cycle management
  • Apply an understanding of cultural factors and contextual factors in project planning and management
  • Demonstrate the ability to apply results-based approaches and develop a results-based framework, and establish a project monitoring and evaluation system with appropriate indicators
  • Apply an understanding of project management skills towards the development of a comprehensive grant proposal

Module Content

  • Intro to the Project Cycle
  • Problem Identification and Situational Analysis
  • Participatory Approaches to Project Formulation
  • Results Based Framework Management
  • Project Implementation and Project Management
  • Monitoring and Evaluation
  • Budgeting for Projects, GANTT Charts
  • Dissemination
  • Donor Relations

Indicative Resources
Mandatory Reading:
https://www.ifrc.org/Global/Publications/monitoring/PPP-Guidance-Manual-English.pdf
Lecture notes and all additional resources will be made available on Blackboard.

Methods of Teaching and Student Learning
A combination of consultation with practitioners in the field (during which the practicalities of programme planning and management will be discussed) and in-class exercises/projects which will simulate real life programme scenarios to allow students to develop PCM skills.

Methods of Assessment
Final marks will be comprised of group work and final project assessment and individual participation. The latter is based on attendance (5%) and a group process contribution assessment (20%). Working in teams you will need to develop, write and submit for marking, a mock grant application (75%) to a major donor. The purpose of this exercise is to integrate the various components covered during the module and deliver a clear, cohesive, and competitive grant proposal.

 

Module Coordinator: Dr Rosalyn Tamming
ECTS Value: 5

Aims
Students will  gain  an  understanding  of  basic  epidemiological  methods  through their application  to  humanitarian  emergencies, including the pre and post emergency phases. This module builds on the Introduction to Epidemiology Module.

Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of this module, students will be able to:

  • Describe the steps of an outbreak investigation
  • Apply key epidemiological concepts to humanitarian emergencies
  • Know the steps in planning, designing and analysing an epidemiological survey taking into consideration appropriate sampling methods
  • Understand the political and other implications of findings from epidemiological surveys or investigations

Module Content

  • Risk assessment
  • Surveillance
  • Outbreak investigation
  • Epidemiological indicators and benchmarks in emergencies
  • Surveys and sampling in humanitarian emergencies
  • Case studies in emergency situations

Indicative Resources
The module coordinator will provide recommended reading lists. lecture notes and additional materials will be posted on Blackboard. Students may find bringing a calculator useful.

Methods of Teaching and Student Learning
This one-week intensive  module  will  be  delivered  through  a  combination  of  lectures,  case  studies, individual and  group  exercises and real-life examples.  Daily  quizzes (on day two and three) will  be  utilised  to  assess  understanding  of  key  concepts presented the  previous  day.

Methods of Assessment
Assessment of this module will be done by daily quizzes and an end of module exam set by the Module Coordinator. The daily quizzes will be worth 10% each and the exam will be worth 80%. The exam will largely follow a case study format. Students may consult class notes during the exam but not textbooks or the internet.

Optional Modules

The following is the list of optional modules which may be available during the 2018/19 academic year (this list is subject to change and will be finalised during Term 1):

Module Coordinator:                     Niall Roche
ECTS Value:                                  5

Aims
This module examines two critical determinants of health that in particular affect the vulnerable in developing countries. The module will introduce students to the key environmental factors (predominantly in the built environment) that currently impact on the health of the poor and practical ways to address these risks to human health. The second part of the module will aim to provide students with an appreciation of climate change as an emerging threat to health and development and examine how health systems need to adapt.

Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of this module, students will be able to:

  • Apply knowledge and understanding of what environmental health and climate change mean in the currently global health context.
  • Develop an awareness of the key components of environmental health to consider in the design and implementation of a public health programme.
  • Develop an awareness of how climate change and health issues can be tackled in terms of financing, actors and action (adaptation and mitigation)
  • Integrate environmental health and climate change into the global debate on poverty alleviation and the achievement of the Millennium Development Goals.

Module Content

  • Introduction to environmental health and climate change
  • Hygiene, Sanitation and Water Supply
  • Settlement planning, vector control and indoor air pollution
  • Tobacco control
  • The science of climate change and the impact of climate change on human health
  • Mitigation and Adaptation to climate change including Disaster Risk Reduction Financing and advocating on the issue of climate change and health

Indicative Resources
The  module  coordinator  and  guest  lecturers  will  provide  recommended  reading  lists.    Lecture notes and additional materials will be posted on Blackboard.

Methods of Teaching and Student Learning
The module will cover approx. 20 hours of contact time. The module is delivered in a participatory fashion encouraging shared learning amongst participants. A range of methods are provided including direct teaching through PowerPoint, brainstorming, group exercises, case studies and video. Teaching and reading materials will be posted through Blackboard to facilitate preparation before class and self‐directed learning.

Methods of Assessment

30% of the module assessment will be gained from a group presentation exercise with the other 70% to be gained from a 2,000-word essay on a given topic.

Module Coordinator: Dr. Nuha Ibrahim
ECTS Value: 5

Aims
This module is aimed at students who are interested in reproductive health throughout the life cycle, and in efforts to improve reproductive, maternal and child health (RMCH) worldwide. It will analyse the causes and extent of the mortality and morbidity associated with RMCH. Existing policy and program interventions to improve maternal and child health will be examined.

Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of this module, students will be able to:

  • Demonstrate a detailed understanding of the global burden of disease related to reproductive, maternal and child health
  • Demonstrate a detailed understanding of the global burden of disease related to reproductive, maternal and child health
  • Assess the barriers and enablers that women face in accessing reproductive health and maternal healthcare
  • Critically evaluate the impact that gaps in health service provision have at the individual, household, community and health service level
  • Analyse current policy and program approaches to address inequalities in maternal and child health, and identify priorities for further action.

Indicative Resources

  • Bhutta, Zulfiqar A., and Robert E. Black. "Global maternal, newborn, and child health—so near and yet so far." New England Journal of Medicine 369.23 (2013): 2226-2235.
  • Lawn, Joy E., et al. "3.6 million neonatal deaths—what is progressing and what is not?." Seminars in perinatology. Vol. 34. No. 6. WB Saunders, 2010.
  • Liu, Li, et al. "Global, regional, and national causes of child mortality: an updated systematic analysis for 2010 with time trends since 2000." The Lancet 379.9832 (2012): 2151-2161.
  • Sen G and Ostlin P [Eds] 2007. Unequal, Unfair, Ineffective and Inefficient, Gender Inequality in Health: Why it exists and how we can change it. Final report to the WHO. Commission on the Social Perspectives in Global Health (read especially pp 22-24). http://www.who.int/social_determinants/resources/csdh_media/wgekn_final_report_07.pdf
  • Jewkes, R.  Flood, M, & Lang, J.  2012 From work with men and boys to changes of social norms and reduction of inequities in gender relations: a conceptual shift in prevention of violence against women and girls in the Lancet published online Nov 21st 2014 http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(14)61683-4
  • Heise, Lori. "What works to prevent partner violence? An evidence overview." (2011). DFID.
  • Campbell, Oona MR, Wendy J. Graham, and Lancet Maternal Survival Series steering group. "Strategies for reducing maternal mortality: getting on with what works." The lancet 368.9543 (2006): 1284-1299.
  • Kerber, Kate J., et al. "Continuum of care for maternal, newborn, and child health: from slogan to service delivery." The Lancet 370.9595 (2007): 1358-1369.
  • Bryce, Jennifer, Cesar G. Victora, and Robert E. Black. "The unfinished agenda in child survival." The Lancet 382.9897 (2013): 1049-1059.
  • United Nations Population Fund. 2015. Shelter from the Storm: 2015 State of World Population. Available here: http://www.unfpa.org/swop

Methods of Teaching and Student Learning
This one week intensive module will be delivered through a combination of lectures, participative group work and discussions. Students are also expected to engage in self-directed learning.

Method of Assessment
Each student will be asked to submit a 2000-word essay, which will constitute 70% of the overall grade for the module. Students will have a choice of essay questions, each of which focuses on issues discussed during the module. Each student will also be asked to submit and present a policy brief based on an interactive component of the module. This will constitute 30% of the overall grade for the module.

Module Coordinator: Dr Ogenna Uduma
ECTS Value: 5

Aims
The module will deal with the importance of human resources in health care delivery, planning and management of human resources, challenges facing the Health sector workforce and major human resource for health issues.

Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of this module, students will be able to:

  • Explain the importance of human resources for health and its key components
  • Understand how the health sector workforce, the skill mix, working environment and available funds influences the effectiveness of the health system and health outcomes
  • Analyse the health sector workforce issues and challenges

 
Module Content

  • Human resources and health an overview
  • Role of research in Human Resources and Health Motivation
  • Mid-level providers

Indicative Resources
A reading list to facilitate learning will be made available at the beginning of the module. Other additional materials will be posted on Blackboard including the Centre for Global Health research on Human Resources and Health.

Methods of Teaching and Student Learning
This one‐week intensive module will use a participatory approach, consisting of lectures, group work for students and case studies. Lecture notes and reading materials will be posted on Blackboard.

Methods of Assessment
The module will have both group (30%) and individual assessment (70%). A human resource for health case study will be made available to groups. Each group will analyse the case and make a presentations on how they will address issues and challenges raised by the case. Each student will submit a word essay on the given case.

Module Coordinator: Prof Joe Barry
ECTS Value: 5

Aims
This module addresses the challenges of achieving ‘Health for All’ while taking into account the concepts and principles of human rights within the health sector. The module will enable students to improve their skills in applying and evaluating these rights.

Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of this module, students will be able to:

  • Identify factors that isolate marginalised groups in society from mainstream health services and which result in a lower quality of lifestyle than is available to the wider society in which they live
  • Critically review the extent to which the process of aid and development embodies some of the discriminatory practices that may disempower those in most need
  • Identify the key principles that underpin human rights discussions within the health sector
  • Demonstrate knowledge of the implications for health within the basic covenants for human rights
  • Explain the human rights principles in relation to all vulnerable populations:
    • Equity; Accessibility; Non-discrimination; and Accountability
  • Describe and discuss the implications on human rights of specific policies and strategies for prioritizing health interventions for vulnerable populations.
  • Formulate a strategy for a low income country to address equity in the accessibility to health care

Module Content

  • Introduction to Health and Human Rights
  • Vulnerable Populations and Right to Health
  • International/Regional Human Rights Instruments and Right to Health
  • United Nations Human Rights System and Right to Health
  • Civil Society and Right to Health
  • International/Development Aid and Right to Health

Methods of Teaching and Student Learning
This one week intensive module will be delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, student‐led discussions and debates.

Indicative Resources

  • Marks, S.P. (2013). Human Rights: A Brief Introduction. Boston, Harvard University http://www.hsph.harvard.edu/stephen-marks/files/2012/08/Marks-Human-Rights-A-brief-intro-June-2013.pdf
  • Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights. (2000). General Comment No. 14, The Right to the Highest Attainable Standard of Health, E/C.12/2000/4. http://www.refworld.org/docid/4538838d0.html
  • Friedman, E. A., & Gostin, L. O. (2012). Pillars for progress on the right to health: Harnessing the potential of human rights through a Framework Convention on Global Health. Health and Human Rights: An International Journal, 14(1).
  • London L (2008). What is a human rights-based approach to health and does it matter? Health and Human Rights, 10(1), 65–80
  • Backman G, Hunt P, Khosla, R et al. (2008). Health systems and the right to health: an assessment of 194 countries. Lancet,372, 2047–2085
  • Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (2005/2008). The Paris Declaration on Aid Effectiveness and the Accra Agenda for Action 2005/2008. Paris: OECD.
  • Amin, A., MacLachlan, M., Mannan, H. et al. (December 2011). EquiFrame: A framework for analysis of the inclusion of human rights and vulnerable groups in health policies. Health and Human Rights, 13(2), 1-20.
  • Sidibé, M., & Buse, K. (2012). A framework convention on global health: a catalyst for justice. Bulletin of the World Health Organization, 90(12), 870-870a.
  • Chapman, A. R. (2009). Globalization, human rights, and the social Perspectives in Global Health. Bioethics, 23(2), 97-111.
  • 25 Questions & Answers on Health and Human Rights (WHO, 2002) http://whqlibdoc.who.int/hq/2002/9241545690.pdf
  • WHO & UNESCO (2006). Health and Human Rights Working Paper Series No 6 Impact Assessments, Poverty and Human Rights: A Case Study Using the Right to the Highest Attainable Standard of Health (http://www.who.int/hhr/Series_6_Impact%20Assessments_Hunt_MacNaughton1.pdf)
  • Maru, D., & Farmer, P. Human rights and health systems development: Confronting the politics of exclusion and the economics of inequality.
  • Lie, R. (2004). Health, human rights and mobilization of resources for health. BMC international health and human rights, 4(1), 4.

Lecture notes and additional materials will be posted on Blackboard.

Methods of Assessment
Students will submit a written assignment (70%) and take part in a group assignment (30%).

Module Coordinator: Dr Ogenna Uduma
ECTS Value: 5


Aims
Available evidence suggests that  a  considerable  proportion  of  the  world’s  population, especially poor women and children  in  low‐income  settings,  are  malnourished.  Directly  and  indirectly,  nutrition  is  related to  the sustainable  development goals  (MDGs),  therefore  without  addressing  the  problems  of  food security and nutrition, the attainment of the SDGs will be compromised. This module is designed to highlight the importance of nutrition to global health.  It will present an overview of the major problems associated with malnutrition (over nutrition and under nutrition) and their impact in both high income and low-income countries and for various population groups. Efforts will be made to highlight existing interventions that have been shown to be effective and the constraints to delivering these in different contexts.

Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of this module, students will be able to:

  • Demonstrate a comprehensive understanding of the importance of nutrition in global health, especially in terms of facilitating the attainment of the first millennium development goal of eradicating extreme poverty and hunger
  • Apply the knowledge of tools and skills for comprehensive and holistic approaches to resolving the challenges of nutrition in a globalised world by examining the success and failures of existing interventions from around the world

Module Content

  • Introduction to nutrition and global health
  • Nutrition, Economic Development and Health
  • International Food Security: the Global Food System
  • Household Food Security: Rural and Urban Livelihoods
  • Determinants of nutritional status
  • Essential nutrients: Macro and Micro
  • Nutritional needs throughout the life cycle
  • Malnutrition in different contexts
  • Health impacts of poor nutrition, including vitamins and mineral deficiencies
  • Existing interventions and best practices
  • Addressing future challenges and their implications for global health

Indicative Resources
The module coordinator and guest lecturers will provide recommended reading lists.   Lecture notes and additional materials will be posted on Blackboard.

Methods of Teaching and Student Learning
This one-week intensive module will be delivered through interactive lectures, seminars, case studies, audio-visual techniques, discussions and group activity.  Guest lecturers, both  from  academic   institutions and civil society, who are experts  in  the  field,  will  be  invited  to  facilitate  sessions  on  the  module. Participants may be assigned to groups to facilitate any assigned group activity. Formal sessions will run for 2 hours followed by informal discussions, case presentations or group activity for 45 minutes. These topics will be examined by presenting case studies from existing nutrition and food security   intervention programmes from around the world, drawing on the lessons of their successes and failures as well as challenges and opportunities.

Methods of Assessment
Students will submit a written assignment (70%) and take part in a group assignment (30%).

Module Coordinator: Dr Ian Hodgson
ECTS Value: 5

Aims
This module introduces key concepts relating to the critical study of the mass media, especially the relationship between media and health; the essential components of advocacy, and the role of communication and media in successful health advocacy initiatives. The module draws on the Centre for Global Health’s affiliation with the international journal ‘Globalization and Health’ and the YouTube Channel ‘This Week in Global Health’ (TWiGH).

Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of this module, students will be able to:

  • Appreciate the essential components of advocacy, and the significance of effective strategy development to ensure maximum impact
  • Understand the use of communication in global health advocacy, and how core messages can be shaped to achieve the expected advocacy outcomes
  • Critically discuss the representation of health topics in various media, and how the mass media shapes the perception of risk, danger, and uncertainty around various health issues
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the process of creating content to be used on social media platforms including specifying a message, identifying a focused audience and developing content that can be delivered on existing platforms

Module Content

  • Communication and the message: shaping information for the maximum impact
  • The development and implementation of advocacy initiatives, and the centrality of communication and information management
  • The role of the media in global health, and shaping public opinion
  • Information and communication technologies, with opportunities for practical application for advocacy and messaging

Assessment

  • The development of a short article (750 words) to use as an advocacy tool, and a critical appreciation of its anticipated impact on the intended audience (1750 words) (70%)
  • The development of short video content (30 seconds) for integration into an episode of This Week in Global Health and the engagement in the process of promoting that content and ensuring that the identified audiences get exposure to it through social media platforms (30%)

Guidance on both components will be provided during the module.

Module Coordinator: Dr Margaret McCann
ECTS Value: 5

Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of this course, students should be able to:

  • Critically discuss the components of a systematic review
  • Successfully formulate a question for a systematic review
  • Critically discuss the principles for designing a search strategy
  • Critically discuss the principles guiding study selection, study quality assessment and data extraction
  • Understand meta‐analysis/meta-synthesis, heterogeneity, subgroup and sensitivity analyses
  • Effectively report and update reviews

Module Content

  • Types of systematic reviews
  • Planning a systematic review
  • Core components of a systematic review
  • Formulating the question for a systematic review
  • Eligibility Criteria
  • Study Identification
  • Quality assessment and data extraction
  • Meta-analysis, meta-synthesis, heterogeneity, subgroup and sensitivity analyses
  • Structured report for systematic reviews

Indicative Resources
A reading list will be provided by the module co-ordinator at the beginning of the module. Additional course materials and lectures notes will be added to Blackboard.

Methods of Teaching and Student Learning
This module will use a combination of short lectures, discussions and group exercises using systematic review topics suggested by students to illustrate key points.

Methods of Assessment
Assessment (100%) of the module will be based on the submission of a plan for the conduct of a systematic review of the student’s choosing (word limit 2500 words). This plan should describe the following: background to the review, eligibility criteria, search strategy, data extraction and quality assessment, analyses or other method for synthesis of the included studies, Heterogeneity (what is expected and how to deal with it), and dissemination.

Module Coordinator: Dr. Emma Heffernan
ECTS Value: 5

Aims
This course explores concepts of ‘sickness’ and health-seeking behaviours across societies.  We take seriously diverse ways of knowing and treating personhood, the body, life and death, disorder and disease.  We view health and illness in their social context arguing that disease is never just about biology but must be examined in historically specific sociocultural frameworks.  This is a highly interactive module design, which requires thoughtful participation from students throughout.

Learning Outcomes
Upon completion of this module the student will be able to
•          Recognise the relevance of critical social perspectives
•          Evaluate the usefulness of theoretical models
•          Examine different knowledge paradigms
•          Critically reflect on policy and practice in medicine

Module Content

  • Introduction – Illness and disease in the field.  The problem of ‘belief’
  • The medical gaze – biomedicine as cultural knowledge
  • Interpreting affliction – chronic conditions
  • Matters of life and death
  • Politics and epistemology – AIDS in South Africa
  • Mental health

Indicative Resources
Reading list will be provided by module co-ordinator.  Additional course materials and lecture notes will be added to Blackboard.

Methods of Teaching and Student Learning
This one‐week intensive module will combine lectures, case studies, seminars, group exercises and a student led debate.

Methods of Assessment
Assessment of the module will be based on participation in a formal classroom debate (30%) and submission of an essay of 2000 words on an assigned topic (70%). Students will have a choice of essay questions, each of which focuses on issues discussed during the module.

(Information and Communications Technologyfor Development - ICT4D)

Module Coordinator: PJ Wall
ECTS Value: 5

Aims
Information and Communications Technology (ICT) is quickly gaining momentum in the field of international development. The growing availability and accessibility of technology in low‐ and middle-income countries (LMICs) has resulted in much discussion about the role of ICT for development (ICT4D), and how ICT4D can best be implemented, scaled and sustained. This model aims to explore and critically analyse core issues related to the implementation and use of ICT in LMICs and ultimately, explore how these issues transcend national boundaries. The module will introduce students to the key issues and current academic debates around ICT4D, and equip students with the knowledge and skills necessary to identify and manage these issues more effectively. The module will also look at the ethical issues involved with ICT4D, and critically examine the role played by social, political, cultural and human factors when introducing and using such systems and technologies. The overall aim is to understand the global ICT4D landscape and to have an appreciation of the challenges and opportunities presented by ICT4D.

 Please note that NO technological skills (e.g. programming, development, design, technical computer skills, etc.) are required for this module.

Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of this module, students will be able to:

  • Apply the main theories, principles and concepts that underpin the study of ICT4D
  • Describe the challenges involved with ICT implementation and use in LMICs, and make informed decisions about how to overcome these issues
  • Give a detailed account of the benefits and problems associated with using health informatics in LMICs
  • Critically examine the ethical considerations surrounding ICT4D
  • Critically examine the effect that social, political, cultural and human factors may have on the implementation and use of ICT4D
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the interdisciplinary nature of ICT4D
  • Identify ways of implementing, scaling and sustaining prototypes and pilot ICT4D projects
  • Critically evaluate and analyse a range of ICT4D cases
  • Demonstrate effective presentation skills and the ability to work both individually and as part of project a team

Module Content

  • Introducing ICT4D
  • The potential of ICT4D: A focus on health informatics
  • Socio-technical considerations for ICT4D
  • Innovative & disruptive technologies and the future direction of ICT4D
  • Designing an ICT4D project.  Implementing and monitoring an ICT4D project
  • A brief introduction to mobile app development
    Final assessment

Indicative Resources
Mandatory Reading

  • Toyama K. Can Technology End Poverty? (2010). Boston Review. 

Link to article: http://bostonreview.net/forum/can-technology-end-poverty

  • Wall, P.J., Vallières, F., McAuliffe, E., Lewis, D. & Hederman, L. (2015). The potential for mHealth in low and middle-income countries: What should programme implementers consider?   In Mobile Health (mHealth): Multidisciplinary Verticals.  Taylor & Francis (CRC Press): Boca Raton.
  • Walsham, Geoff (2017). "ICT4D research: reflections on history and future agenda." Information Technology for Development 23.1: 18-41.

Additional Reading

  • Toyama, K. (2015). Geek Heresy: rescuing social change from the cult of technology. Public Affairs: New York.
  • Heeks, Richard (2010). "Do information and communication technologies (ICTs) contribute to development?" Journal of International Development 22.5: 625-640.

The module coordinator and guest lecturers may also provide additional recommended reading.  All lecture notes and additional materials will be posted on Blackboard.

Methods of Teaching and Student Learning
The module will cover approximately 24 hours of contact time. The module is delivered in a participatory fashion encouraging shared learning amongst participants. A range of methods  are  provided  including  direct  teaching, brainstorming, group exercises, case studies and audio/video. Teaching and reading materials will be posted through Blackboard to facilitate preparation before class and self-learning.

Methods of Assessment
Students will be required to develop, and present for marking, an ICT4D intervention proposal. Students will be asked to present their idea for an ICT4D intervention during the first or second week of April. This presentation will comprise 100% of their final mark.

Trinity Term (April - September)

In Term 3, students are expected to undertake and complete a programme of research leading to the writing and submission of a dissertation. The dissertation may be written following research and/or field placement with partner organizations or research institutions, government departments, international agencies, and civil society organizations in Ireland or elsewhere. Students who decide to complete their research projects overseas will need additional funds of up to €1,500 to cover the costs involved.

Individual schedules for Term 3 will depend on arrangements previously agreed by students and research supervisors for field placement or research. Assessment of the research project will be by submission of a dissertation of a maximum of 15,000 words, which is to be submitted by September of the year of registration.

Compulsory Module

Module Coordinator: Dr Nuha Ibrahim
ECTS Value: 30

Aims
Upon completion of the taught component of the programme, students will undertake and complete an independent research project leading to the writing and submission of a dissertation. The aim of the dissertation is to develop independent analytical thought on a chosen topic, through a research project involving a critical investigation of a phenomenon relevant to global health. The dissertation may be written following research and/or field placement with government departments, international agencies and civil society organisations in Ireland or elsewhere. Students may also choose to write a systematic review for submission as a dissertation. The research proposal will be developed over the first two terms of the programme through related seminars and in consultation with the assigned research supervisor. Prior to commencement of the research project, students must obtain ethical approval from the relevant bodies.

Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of this module, students will be able to:

  • Independently plan and conduct a global health‐related research project in a domestic or international setting utilising appropriate methodological skills and, in an ethically responsible manner;
  • Effectively handle obstacles encountered during the research process and mitigate accordingly;
  • Keep a personal (e) journal to log your research experiences during the project to share with your supervisor and other students;
  • Disseminate research  findings  in  a  conference  setting  (poster  and  oral  presentation)  and prepare manuscript for a peer-reviewed journal.

Indicative Resources
The research dissertation guide outlines the important deadlines in preparation for dissertation work in Term 3, as well as specific guidelines on the writing and submission of the dissertation. Additional information may be provided in related preparation seminars and posted on Blackboard.

Methods of Teaching and Student Learning
The research project will be developed over the first two terms of the programme through related seminars and in consultation with the assigned research supervisor.

Methods of Assessment
The dissertation will be examined under the same grading guidelines outlined in the Student Handbook by two internal examiners. The final overall mark will be determined by averaging the two final marks by the two examiners.  The External examiner(s) will mark a representative sample of the dissertations and any dissertations where the examiners’ assessment differs a) by more than 10% or b) across the pass/fail or pass/distinction grade. Examiners will be guided by a dissertation assessment form outlining a number of criteria, as outlined in the research dissertation guide.

Research Project Locations of Previous Students

Graduates of the MSc in Global Health programme have produced a diverse range of research dissertations.  Titles of these dissertations are available in the MSc in Global Health Alumni section: http://www.global-health.tcd.ie/postgraduate/msc/alumni/

Current Students

Current MSc in Global Health students can log on to the dedicated course websiteTCD Blackboard

MSc Global Health 2017/2018

 

MSc Global Health 2017/18

Maria Paula Acuna Gonalex
Country: Argentina
Background: Pshchology

Morgane Clarke
Country: Ireland
Background: Pharmacology

Camille Philips
Country: USA
Background: Psychology

Kelly Goudie
Country: Canada
Background: Nutrition and Health Education

N'dea Moore-Petinak
Country: USA
Background: Political Science and Public Halth Science

Surbhi Sheokand
Country: India
Background: Medicine

Emer Murphy
Country: Ireland
Background: International Development and Food Policy

Fuad Rahman
Country: Dubai/Bangladesh
Background: Pharmacy

Erin Donovan
Country: USA
Background: International Developme t

Annahl Hoole
Country: Shri Lanka/USA
Background: Medicine

Varsha Shetty
Country: India
Background: Dental Surgery

Precious McPharlen Jere
Country Ireland/Tanzania/Malawi
Background: Social Science

Daniel Markovits
Country: Ireland
Background: Medicine

Zahika Shah
Country: India
Background: Medicine

Alumni

For further information about past graduates and their research projects please click on the link below.


Alumni